Origami

by Beth Haley

From this blank square of paper, the zen question, “Who am I?” becomes, “What am I?”

This seemingly simple art can fold and unfold into many layers of meaning.

The end result is, not necessarily, as important as the process of creating. If we are mindful throughout this creative endeavor, we may each see something different.


“All things are given life and form.”

Religion in Chinese Garments by

Karl Ludvig Reichelt


The square is the uncarved block (Pu is a Chinese word meaning “unworked wood”). The Taoist meaning of Pu is: perception without prejudice and without the distinctions of right or wrong, beautiful or ugly, good or bad, black or white.

This square of paper is my uncarved block.


Transformation

Fold after fold. Crease and un-crease; a new creation is coming into being. Just like we can take the old lines and creases of our life and transform them into something new.


Memory

The paper has memory; it remembers its past lines. They are like scars on the soul. They may heal, but once there, those lines remain.


Self examination

We can unfold (turn back time), and remember our past. Then, make new creases and story lines to form a new shape, outlook, new picture, or a new present and future.


Haley 2019



9 Comments

    1. Pilgrimage Studio

      The bird I made is the Crane. There is an ancient Japanese legend about the 1000 Cranes. I have a container full of them, but not 1000 πŸ™‚. Yet! If you’re interested, here are some links to some stories involving the 1000 Cranes.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s